Research

RESEARCH OVERVIEW

Broadly speaking, my research aims to understand how health inequalities across social groups are produced and perpetuated over time and in different social contexts.  My current research revolves around three themes.

The first concerns the extent to which population health and health disparities—as well as changes therein—are shaped by demographic processes (fertility and marriage in particular).  The U.S. society has undergone profound structural changes since World War II, including rising shares of never-married individuals, increasing rates of divorce, intensifying assortative mating, and growing fractions of college-educated men and women.  Drawing on decades of demographic literature, my research examines how these demographic changes contribute to health inequality at the population level.

The second theme is related to the way in which work and family combine together to facilitate or constrain individuals’ and couples’ health behaviors, as well as how gender ideologies moderate these processes.  Building on insights from occupational-health, work-and-family, and gender studies, I identify how couples’ decisions such as diet and exercise are determined by time-related work characteristics and home arrangements.  I was recently awarded the Early Career Fellowship (2018-2019) by the Work and Family Researchers Network and was on an expert panel on 2017’s Best & Worst States for Working Dads.

The third theme is concerned with how socioeconomic status and health co-evolve over the life course and across multiple generations.  Inspired by the life course and social stratification research, projects along this line investigate transmission of advantage and disadvantage (health and SES) from parents or even earlier generations to the current generation.


PUBLICATIONS (PEER-REVIEWED)

Fan, Wen. Conditionally accepted. “Micro-Level Experiences of Macro-Level Change: A Cohort Perspective on Urban China’s De-emphasis of State Sector Employment.” Advances in Life Course Research.

Fan, Wen. 2017. “Education Delayed but not Denied: The Chinese Cultural Revolution Cohort Returning to School.” Advances in Life Course Research 33C: 53-65.

Fan, Wen, and Yue Qian. 2017. “Native-Immigrant Occupational Segregation and Worker Health in the United States, 2004-2014.” Social Science & Medicine 183: 130-141.

Moen, Phyllis, Erin Kelly, Shi-Rong Lee, J. Michael Oakes, Wen Fan, Jeremy Bray, David Almeida, Leslie Hammer, David Hurtado, and Orfeu Buxton. 2017. “Can a Flexibility/Support Initiative Reduce Turnover Intentions and Exits? Results from the Work, Family, and Health Network.” Social Problems 64: 53-85.

Fan, Wen. 2016. “Turning Point or Selection? The Effect of Rustication on Subsequent Health for the Chinese Cultural Revolution Cohort.” Social Science & Medicine 157: 68-77.

Moen, Phyllis, Erin Kelly, Wen Fan, Shi-Rong Lee, David Almeida, Ellen Kossek, and Orfeu Buxton. 2016. “Does a Flexibility/Support Organizational Initiative Improve High-Tech Employees’ Well-Being? Evidence from the Work, Family, and Health Network.” American Sociological Review 81(1): 134-164.

Fan, Wen, Jack Lam, Phyllis Moen, Erin Kelly, Rosalind King, and Susan McHale. 2015. “Constrained Choices: Linking Employees’ and Spouses’ Work Conditions to Health Behaviors.” Social Science & Medicine 126: 99-109.

Fan, Wen, and Phyllis Moen. 2015. “Comment: Capturing Linked Lives—A Promising New Method.” Sociological Methodology 45: 51-56.

Fan, Wen, and Yue Qian. 2015. “Long-Term Health and Socioeconomic Consequences of Early-Life Exposure to the 1959-1961 Chinese Famine.” Social Science Research 49: 53-69.

– Winner of the Frank Mott Award, Department of Sociology, Ohio State University

– For a Chinese summary, see here

Lam, Jack, Kimberly Fox, Wen Fan, Phyllis Moen, Erin Kelly, Leslie Hammer, and Ellen Kossek. 2015. “Manager Characteristics and Employee Job Insecurity around a Merger Announcement: The Role of Status and Crossover.” The Sociological Quarterly 56(3): 558-580.

Kelly, Erin, Phyllis Moen, J. Michael Oakes, Wen Fan, Cassandra Okechukwu, Kelly D. Davis, Leslie Hammer, Ellen Kossek, Rosalind Berkowitz King, Ginger Hanson, Frank Mierzwa, Lynne Casper. 2014. “Changing Work and Work-Family Conflict: Evidence from the Work, Family, and Health Network.” American Sociological Review 79(3): 485-516.

– Winner of the 2015 Rosabeth Moss Kanter International Award for Research Excellence in Work and Family

Lam, Jack, Wen Fan, and Phyllis Moen. 2014. “Is Insecurity Worse for Well-being in Turbulent Times? Mental Health in Context.” Society and Mental Health 4(1): 55-73. (Featured podcast)

Moen, Phyllis, Wen Fan, and Erin Kelly. 2013. “Team-Level Flexibility, Work-Home Spillover, and Health Behavior.” Social Science & Medicine 84: 69-79.


SELECTED PRESENTATIONS

2017 “Rising Educational Gradients in Mortality: What are the Roles of Marital Status and Educational Assortative Mating?” 112th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association, Regular
Section on Mortality and Morbidity. Montreal, Quebec, Canada. August 12-15, 2017.

2017 “A Decomposition of Trends in the Nonmarital Infant Mortality Ratios in the United States: 1983- 2010.” 112th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association, Regular Session on Sociological Approaches to Population Processes. Montreal, Quebec, Canada. August 12-15, 2017.
2017 “Rising Educational Gradients in Mortality: What are the Roles of Marital Status and Educational Assortative Mating?” 2017 Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America, Regular Session on Marriage, Education, and Health Inequalities. Chicago, IL. April 27-29, 2017.
2017 “A Decomposition of Trends in the Nonmarital Infant Mortality Ratios in the United States: 1983- 2010.” 2017 Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America, Regular Session on Maternal Health and Mortality. Chicago, IL. April 27-29, 2017.
2017 “Rising Educational Gradients in Mortality: What are the Roles of Marital Status and Educational Assortative Mating?” RC28 Spring Meeting 2017. Cologne, Germany. March 30-April 1, 2017.
2017 “Long-Term Effects of Large Shocks? The Chinese Cultural Revolution, College Education and Health.” China Sociology Dinner Meeting. Boston, MA. March 7, 2017.
2016 “Changing Work and Well-being among U.S High-Tech Professionals: Findings from the Work, Family and Health Study.” 2016 WFRN (Work and Family Researchers Network) Conference. Symposium: Happy Workers and Productive Organizations. Washington, DC. June 23-25, 2016.
2016 “Job Strain, Time Strain and Well-being: A Dynamic Holistic Approach.” 2016 WFRN (Work and Presentations Family Researchers Network) Conference. Symposium: Consequences of Job Strain and Overwork. Washington, DC. June 23-25, 2016.
2015 “Linking Job Insecurity with Work-Family Conflict: Do Gender and Breadwinning Status Matter?” 110th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association, Section on Organizations, Occupations and Work. Chicago, IL. August 22-25, 2015.
2015 “Micro-Level Experiences of Macro-Level Change: A Cohort Perspective on Urban China’s De-emphasis of State Sector Employment.” 80th Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America. San Diego, CA. April 30-May 2, 2015.
2014 “Education Delayed But Not Denied: The Cultural Revolution Cohort Returning to School.” XVIII ISA World Congress of Sociology. World Atlas of Adult Education. Yokohama, Japan. July 13-19, 2014.
2014 “Timing Matters: Disrupted Education, Returning to School, and Self-Reported Health of Three Chinese Cohorts.” Department of Demography. Renmin University of China. May 21, 2014. 
2013 “Born to be Better Educated? Comparison of Seasonality Tests and Application on Educational Attainment in China.” 108th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association, Regular Session on Methodology: New Methods for Stratification Research. New York, NY. August 10-13, 2013.
2013 “Unemployment and its Consequences on Workers’ and Spouses’ Health: Evidence from China’s 1990s-2000s Massive Layoff.” 108th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association, Regular Session on Health Disparities. New York, NY. August 10-13, 2013.
2013 “Costs of Coming of Age in China’s Cultural Revolution? Disrupted Education and Its Consequences on Mid-Life Health.” 78th Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America, Regular Session on SES and Health and Mortality. New Orleans, LA. April 11-13, 2013.
2013 “Long-Run Health Consequences of Early-Life Exposure to the 1959-61 China Famine.” 78th Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America, Regular Session on The Long-Term Impact of Famines and Environmental Shocks. New Orleans, LA. April 11-13, 2013.
2013 “Costs of Coming of Age in China’s Cultural Revolution? Disrupted Education and Mid-Life Health” 76th Annual Meeting of the Midwest Sociological Society, Regular Session on Sociological Perspectives on China II. Chicago, IL. March 27-30, 2013.
2013 “Educational Attainment and Its Effects on Mid-Life Health: Evidence from the Chinese Cultural Revolution Cohort.” Inequality & Methods Workshop. Department of Sociology, University of Minnesota. March 1, 2013.
2012 “Constrained Choices: Linking Employees’ and Spouses’ Work Conditions to Health Behaviors.” American Sociological Association Annual Meetings, Regular Session on Interactions between Work and Family. Denver, CO. Aug. 17-20, 2012.
2012 “Long-run Health Consequences of Early-life Exposure to the 1959-1961 China Famine.” American Sociological Association Annual Meetings, Regular Session on Life Course. Denver, CO. Aug. 17-20, 2012.
2012 “Constrained Choice of Food and Exercise: Linking Work Environment to Employees’, Their Spouses’, and Their Children’s Health Behaviors” 75th Annual Meeting of the Midwest Sociological Society, Regular Session on Sociology of Health & Health Care. Minneapolis, MN, March 29-April 1, 2012.
2012 “Constrained Choices: Linking Employees’ and Spouses’ Work Conditions to Health Behaviors” 82nd Annual Meeting of the Eastern Sociological Society, Regular Session on Under Pressure: Workers’ Time on the Job. New York City, NY, February 23-26, 2012.
2011 “The Dynamics of Work-Home Spillover and Health-Related Behaviors under Conditions of Organizational Change” 74th Annual Meeting of the Midwest Sociological Society, Session on Work and Family. St. Louis, MO, March 24-27, 2011.
2011 “Linking Organizational Flexibility with Health Behaviors: Do Gender, Spillover and Family Contexts Matter?” American Sociological Association Annual Meetings, Regular Session on Family and Work: Time, Flexibility, and Shifting Meanings of Family and Work. Las Vegas, NV. Aug. 20-23, 2011.